Tag Archives: Today’s food

Today’s food: char-siu rice bowl lunchbox

lunch box: Char-siu pork rice bowl

This char-siu was initially made for my ramen. Japanese style char-siu is deceptively simple, and involves simply tying up a hunk of pork (loin or belly) and stew the pork in a mixture of water, soy sauce, sake, and sugar, while staying somewhat vigilant to scoop up any gunk that floats around. The soy sauce mixture used to stew the pork can later be boiled down and reused for stewing other bits of pork, or as a savory, porky alternative to soy sauce. In the case of this rice bowl, the reduced sauce was poured on top. Wonderful stuff served with some stir-fried bok choy.

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Filed under faux chinese, Japanese, ramen

Today’s food: roasted miso mushroom pasta

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Miso roasted under the broiler, enoki mushrooms, oyster mushrooms, grated parmesan, olive oil.

Little nubbins of toasted miso in a cheesy miso sauce. Miso and dairy cannot go wrong.

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Filed under Japanese, pasta

Today’s food: green curry with sômen noodles

Green curry and somen noodles

This derives from a recent trend in Japan of dumping canned ready-made green curry onto sômen noodles. My green curry somen deviates from the original by mixing in some fish broth and kaeshi (mixture of mirin, sugar, soy sauce) into the green curry to temper the heat and to increase the amount of the very little green curry that I had left. However, if you have enough green curry, you can also just dump it on the boiled sômen noodles.

Strange as it seems, it’s a pretty marvelous combination. The fish broth and kaeshi actually works well with the fish sauce that’s already present in the curry.

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Filed under Food, Japanese noodles, Thai

Today’s food: Simple noodles topped with mapo nappa

Nappa mapo on noodles

 

I’m still mortified that I used the word “overload” in my earlier post. It’s just one of those words like “explosion” that immediately discredits the dish by its name. However, I am going to keep that word there to remind myself of what a humiliating being I can be.

Noodle soup topped with simplified mapo. Instead of sweet black bean sauce (ten men jian), I season the mapo with only do ban jian (hot bean sauce), garlic (which are sauteed in oil before everything else is thrown in), soy sauce, wine, and sugar. The nappa doesn’t have an assertive texture, but blends in and adds some heft to the mapo sauce.
The simple noodle soup is just my leftover turkey broth seasoned with soy sauce and rice wine.

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Filed under faux chinese, Japanese noodles, ramen

Today’s food: Mushroom overload with hot and sour noodles

Mushroom hot and sour soup with noodles

The only thing more comforting than hot and sour soup is hot and sour soup noodles. Since the soup only requires dumping in chicken stock, cooking wine and soy sauce in a pan with ingredients, and finishing it up with white pepper, cornstarch mixed with a bit of water, and black vinegar, its an ideal dish to make when your head is pounding with residual beer from last night.

In this version, in lieu of the traditional ingredients, I dumped in any mushroom I can find in my house. Dried wood ear, dried shiitake, enoki, and whatever else was rolling around in my crisper drawer. Stuck a heap of homemade chili oil on top.

It was glorious.

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Filed under faux chinese

Today’s food: gochujang carbonara

Carbonara-style with gochujang, pork belly, garlic, green onions

I always thought the method employed in carbonara of creating a thick, rich sauce from whole eggs had a lot of potential. For this dish, I rendered the fat out of sliced pork belly, mixed in some sandon noodles (udon will work fine) and then tossed the noodles in an egg and gochujang (korean chili paste) mixture, warming it up carefully so the eggs won’t completely congeal. Threw in some green onions, and I was finished. Simple, and a great way to use up the big vat of gochujang sitting in my fridge.

 

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Filed under Japanese noodles, pasta, udon

Today’s food: deep fried cauliflower with tahini sauce

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With tabbouleh-like salad, and baba ganoush, and leftover french bread.

Cauliflower deep fried at 350f for 3 minutes: not crunchy, but delicious nevertheless.

 

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Filed under Food